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Compare for yourself between Liquid Solar Lamination and conventional vacuum lamination

Glass handling
Cell handling
Encapsulation
Quality control during process

Glas handling

 

Liquid Solar Lamination

Vacuum lamination (EVA)

 glass with anti reflective coating, foil protected
recommended
recommended
 Wet glass cleaning
not required
yes
 Waste water
no
yes
 Energy consumption
low
high
 Maintenance intensity
low
high
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Cell handling

Liquid Solar Lamination

Vacuum lamination (EVA)

  • Low mechanical stress on the cell
  • Low cell fracturing rate
  • Secure handling of very thin cells
  • Strings soldered before placement
  • Placement of complete strings on glass
  • High cell fracturing rate (approx. 0,3%)
  • Process not fully automated and cell positioning unprecise
  • Complex machines for automation and still a lot of manual control needed
  • High mechanical stress for the cell
  • Very thin cells cannot be handled
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Encapsulation

Liquid Solar Lamination

Vacuum lamination (EVA)

  • Cells are fully encapsulated with silicone
  • Low energy consumption
  • Very precice process positioning
  • Easy handling of the silicone
  • Curing within 2 minutes at 80 ºC
  • No vacuum required
  • No thermal or mechanical stress for the cells
    (only 80 ºC process temperature and no pressure applied!)
  • Little risk of micro cracks
  • No evaporation of gasses from the sealing agent
  • Environmentaly friendly
  • Cell are not fixated between sheets of EVA
  • High energy consumption to heat and lamintate at 150°C
  • Process unprecise
  • Enclosure of gas bubbles possible
  • Long duration process 12 - 15 min
  • Vacuum required, again boosting energy consumption
  • Thermal and mechanical stress for the cells through applied heat and pressure
  • High risk of module damage, aprox. 0,1 – 0,2 %
  • Evaporation of gasses from the used materials
  • High maintenance for the process
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Quality control during process

Liquid Solar Lamination

Vacuum lamination (EVA)

  • Quality control is possible during all process stages
    (i.e. flashing before lamination)
  • Exchange of faulty cells/strings before lamination possible, modules repaired, not scrapped
  • All faults can easily be traced due to quality control during process
  • Very few modules not 100% suited for sale
  • Higher yield of top grade modules
  • Quality control (flashing) can only be done after lamination
  • Modules with faulty cells/strings cannot be repaired and need to be scrapped
  • Faults can only be detected after lamination but can not easily be traced back
  • Higher share of lower grade modules due to minor faults
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